versus vs versus

Usability vs. User Experience: what’s the difference?

Usability User Experience
• Usability is about trying to get something done intuitively and easily. The goal is to remove any roadblocks that would keep people from performing the task at hand • User experience deals with how a person feels—their emotional connection, if any, to the task at hand.
• Usability is really only one of the many layers that influence the overall experience. • Visual design, interaction design, information architecture, and content strategy are also part of that bigger picture. UX is the sum of all those layers, gauged by a person’s emotional response.
  • Successful UX means asking: Who really are our users? And what makes them tick? What are they hoping to accomplish? Understanding the motivations and rationale of your users should influence every aspect of your product.

User Experience vs. User Interface: what’s the difference?

User Experience User Interface
• Is the Interaction itself
• Includes Interface
• Address all aspects of a thing as        perceived by a person
• A Tool 
• A Point of Interaction 
• A Means of communication between   person and system
• The quality of a user’s experience influences that person’s level of trust and confidence in your business and compels them to act (or not act).  • The interface, in turn, gives them a means by which to act.
• UX is Designing for Emotion, UX design deals with the overall experience associated with the use of a product or service. • UI design deals with the specific user interface(s) of a product or service. The UI can be a component of UX, but many user experiences don’t have UIs. The design of a UI will be heavily informed by the UX design. The UX design will be less informed by the UI.

User Experience Design vs. Interaction Design: what’s the difference?

User Experience Interaction Design
• On the other hand user experience is a term associated more with the overall feeling of a user throughout his use of a product rather than with the individual interaction tools that will be made available throughout it’s various phases. The use of a product may be assisted or unassisted, trained or untrained, and the challenge is greater when it is unassisted. • Interaction Design deals with the way a user consumes and interacts with a product and therefore the interaction designer is the person that decides how this should happen.
• The quality of a user’s experience influences that person’s level of trust and confidence in your business and compels them to act (or not act).  • The concern of the interaction designer is the interaction tools made available to the user.
• UX is Designing for Emotion, UX design deals with the overall experience associated with the use of a product or service. • UI design deals with the specific user interface(s) of a product or service. The UI can be a component of UX, but many user experiences don’t have UIs. The design of a UI will be heavily informed by the UX design. The UX design will be less informed by the UI.

Usable Talk!

Usability is the ease of use and learnability of a human-made object. The object of use can be a software application, website, book, tool, machine, process, or anything a human interacts with, in other words Usability means making products and systems easier to use, and matching them more closely to user needs and requirements.

The international standard, ISO 9241-11, provides guidance on usability and defines it as:

“The extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use.”

The primary notion of usability is that an object designed with a generalized users’ psychology and physiology in mind is, for example:

  • More efficient to use—takes less time to accomplish a particular task
  • Easier to learn—operation can be learned by observing the object
  • More satisfying to use

Usability consultant Jakob Nielsen and computer science professor Ben Shneiderman have written (separately) about a framework of system acceptability, where usability is a part of “usefulness” and is composed of:

  • Learnability: How easy is it for users to accomplish basic tasks the first time they encounter the design?
  • Efficiency: Once users have learned the design, how quickly can they perform tasks?
  • Memorability: When users return to the design after a period of not using it, how easily can they re establish proficiency?
  • Errors: How many errors do users make, how severe are these errors, and how easily can they recover from the errors?
  • Satisfaction: How pleasant is it to use the design?

Usability should not be confused with ‘functionality’, however, as this is purely concerned with the functions and features of the product and has no bearing on whether users are able to use them or not. Increased functionality does not mean improved usability!

Again, these are already know facts, but I faced this in recent times, so thought of jotted it down.